Cat

American forest cat

If you’re looking for a handsome giant in a feline companion, the Maine Coon has what you’re looking for. The loyal, dignified, majestic Maine Coon represents all of this and more – and while maintaining some serious goals.

1 Maine attraction
The Maine Coon is considered to be the oldest native cat breed in North America and has made a name for itself among the Mainern as a trained moult, farm cat and shipyard companion since the 19th century. Where she lived before is a mystery. Some say she arrived alongside the Vikings; others say she is a descendant of Marie Antoinette’s adored long-haired cats; and others mark her as stowaways who arrived in the States with sea captains who sailed the ocean blue.

Photo: GlobalP | Getty Images

2 A strong cat
She’s strong for a reason. A native of New England, the Maine Coon evolved the Darwinian way to live up to her name as a work cat and successfully weather the harsh winters of the Northeast. Even so, this gentle giant is one of the largest domestic cat breeds in the world, with females weighing 9 to 18 pounds and males weighing 20 pounds or more. And they only reach their full size at the age of 5.

3 Think for a long time
According to the Guinness World Records, the title of longest domestic cat has been held by Maine Coons for more than 10 years. The current defending champion is Barivel from Italy who measured a whopping 3 feet 11 inches when the last measurement was taken in May 2018!

Photo: Bettina_Sentner | Getty Images

4 This coat!
The Maine Coon’s coat is their crowning glory. It consists of not one, not two, but three different lengths – a heavy and short length rests on the shoulders; longer lengths are found on the abdomen and upper hind legs (britches); and a romantic, lion-like ruff can be seen around her neck. Then there are the tufted paws that are reminiscent of snowshoes and enable you to step on in cold temperatures. And to top it off, we have this luscious tail flag that can be wrapped around your body for warmth and protection.

5 Surprisingly low maintenance
You’d think the Maine Coon would need a lot of maintenance, but that’s negative. The Maine Coon’s coat, while thick and long, is rarely dull and only requires weekly combing to keep it in tip-top shape!

American forest cat

Many believe the Maine Coon earned its nickname because it’s part cat, part raccoon. While their markings and bushy tail might make you think the same, such pairing is biologically impossible, but an interesting concept nonetheless. Photo: Getty Images

6 family cat
Children, cats, dogs … they don’t call her a gentle giant for nothing! The Maine Coon, who have a long lifespan of 10 to 13 years, is known for their kindness, affection, and compassion. It is therefore an excellent companion animal for all ages and species! Even better, the breed has been cited as an excellent choice for pet emotional support and therapy purposes since it is so perfect at reading clues from its people!

7 Love to be loved
Maine Coons are so relaxed and affectionate that they don’t mind dressing up or riding in a stroller. As long as they are showered with love and attention, anything is possible!

8 Easy to train
The intelligent and curious Maine Coon has often been described as canine because of the desire to play fetch and learn to walk on a leash. Another quality of dog she is known to have? An affinity for water! Don’t be surprised if she splashes in your sink, turns her bowl of water into a swimming pool, or tries to dive upside down in the bathtub!

9 let’s chat
Though they meow and purr like any other cat, the Maine Coon is known for their cute communication skills, which means you can often hear their chirps, beeps, or trills to get your undivided attention.

10 Some farewell tips …
The Maine Coon loves to be in your business all the time. So if you really want a little privacy, you have to close a door and let me have some time. You have been warned.

Featured image: pshenina_m | Getty Images

Continue reading: 5 important lessons kids can learn from cats

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